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01 Dec 2014

Sigma Delta Chi Finally, Whitfield asserts, Congress only intended the statute to cover a narrow set of especially egregious conduct that would not include the very limited movement at issue in this case. He emphasizes that the bank robbery statute was enacted just a few weeks after the notorious bank robber John Dillinger committed the latest in a string of highly publicized bank robberies in which he used hostages as human shields while fleeing from the bank. It was that kind of conduct, he concludes, that Congress was targeting when it imposed such stringent penalties for forced accompaniment. The federal government counters that the forced accompaniment provision clearly applies to Whitfields conduct. Both in 1934 and now, it argues, accompany meant to go along with. Although the word typically connotes joint movement, there is no minimum amount of travel required, and it is often used to describe going with someone from one room to the next. Indeed, the government notes, the Supreme Court itself has used the word in that context describing, for example, a scenario in which police officers asked a suspect to get dressed and to accompany them into the living room as have authors like Charles Dickens, Jane Austen, and Henry James. By contrast, the government declares, Whitfields interpretation would effectively . . .
For the original version including any supplementary images or video, visit http://www.scotusblog.com/2014/12/argument-preview-parsing-accompany-in-the-federal-bank-robbery-statute/

One Direction makes Billboard history, knocks Swift from No. 1 - Yahoo News

Swift's "1989" dropped to No. 2 this week with 214,000 sales. The album became the biggest debut of the year after opening with 1.3 million copies, and held the top spot on the Billboard 200 chart for three consecutive weeks. "1989" has sold more than 2.2 million copies, the second-biggest selling album of 2014, behind only Disney's "Frozen" soundtrack with 3.6 million copies. Other new entries in the top 10 of the Billboard 200 chart this week include Canadian rockers Nickelback at No. 4 with "No Fixed Address" and metal group In This Moment at No.
For the original version including any supplementary images or video, visit http://news.yahoo.com/one-direction-makes-billboard-history-knocks-swift-no-223248692.html



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